State. Religion. Society. Securitization of Religious Freedom - Religion and Scope of State Control

Kuupäev: 
17.11.17 (Kogu päev) to 18.11.17 (Kogu päev)

Location: 
National Library of Estonia, Tõnismägi 2, 15189 Tallinn, Estonia


Seminars for doctoral and master students

The seminars will take place in conjunction with a conference organized by the Faculty of Law and Ministry of Internal Affairs under the auspices of Estonia’s EU Council presidency in the second half of 2017.    Registration is closed!

Introduction

There is an anxiety and tension in Europe and beyond. Some see everything in terms of civilizational conflict, be it, robustly termed, conflict between Christian Europe and Islam; or even between liberal rights and cultural/religious identity. The truth is probably that the social and political situation and atmosphere is changing very quickly and it has become increasingly more complex to rationalize over the processes that take place. The recent migration crisis and current developments in US immigration policies have contributed to the tensions.

Proposed solutions to the tensions have varied from strong claims for more religion (also traditional religion/culture) in the public sphere to strong claims of no-religion in the public sphere. Tighter rules have emerged to tackle both real and imagined threats to security. It is perhaps correct to argue that both individual and collective freedom of religion or belief for all has become an endangered species of human rights in this atmosphere.  Thus, it is important to address some of these issues head on. There is a value to mapping the current legal-political-social responses in the European Union to the, if you wish, securitization of religious freedom (Security is seen here as a broader term: including physical security and integrity, but also human security in a broader sense).

The Goal of the Seminars

Both security and religious freedom are important and need each other, and the aim of the event is to discuss and analyze opportunities to advance both freedom of religion or belief and security. This topic is interdisciplinary, and interested non-law doctoral students are also invited to attend.

The aim of the seminars is to provide students with the skills and ability to understand and assess current controversial/divisive issues in the field of law, religion, and security. Students have an exclusive opportunity to discuss these issues with experts from all EU countries. The participants are all well-known experts of law and religion, constitutional law and human rights. They also belong to major international organizations such as the European Consortium for Church and State Research (ECCSR) and to the International Consortium for Law and Religion Studies (ICLARS). In addition to the presenters and chairs listed below, 30 more professors from the European Consortium for Church and State Research will be attending the seminars, providing students with an invaluable opportunity to network and discuss their research. There also will be practitioners, including the European Court of Human Rights judge Vincent de Gaetano.

The seminars will take place in conjunction with a conference organized by the Faculty of Law and Ministry of Internal Affairs under the auspices of Estonia’s EU Council presidency in the second half of 2017. Students are also welcome and encouraged to register for the conference (NB! separate registration is needed – aive.suik@ut.ee). Attending the entire conference will give students the advantage of an interdisciplinary perspective on the topic. Attendees at the conference will be academics from various disciplines as well as representatives of religious organizations and governmental institutions. For more information about the conference and the program contact Dr. Merilin Kiviorg (merilin.kiviorg@ut.ee). The preliminary programme of the entire conference is added here.

PROGRAMME

Friday 17 November 2017

11.30 – 13.00

National Library, Small hall (language: English)

Two 20-minute presentations, followed by shorter reflections by members of the ECCSR and discussion with doctoral students.

  • Legislation and Policies adopted to tackle radicalization and extremism in the EU law/effects of these measures on religious liberty - Dr. hab. Michal RYNKOWSKI, European Commission, Belgium
  • Legislation directly and indirectly adopted to tackle radicalization and extremism in different EU countries /effects of this legislation - Prof. Agustin MOTILLA, Universidad Carlos III, Spain

Chair: Prof. Balázs SCHANDA, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Hungary

13.00 – 14.00 Lunch

14.00 – 15.30   

National Library, Small hall (language: English)

Two 20-minute presentations, followed by shorter reflections by members of the ECCSR and discussion with doctoral students.

  • Hate Speech and (Autonomy of) Religious Communities– Prof. Lina PAPADOPOULOU, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Law School, Greece
  • Hate Speech and Individual Religious Liberty - Prof. MACHADO Jónatas, Rua Don Ernesto Sena de Oliveira, Portugal

Chair: Prof. Blaz IVANC, University of Ljubljana

18.00 – 20.00 Dinner

 

Saturday 18 November 2017

National Library, Small hall (language: English)

9.00 – 10.30

A main 30-min presentation, followed by shorter reflections by members of the ECCSR and discussion with doctoral students

  • Gender issues in combating radicalization - Prof. Mathias PULTE, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany

Chair: Prof. Achilles EMILIANIDES, University of Nicosia, Cyprus

10.30-11.00    Coffee Break

11.00-12.30   

A main 30-min presentation, followed by shorter reflections by members of the ECCSR and discussion with doctoral students

  • Education and combat with radicalization/extremism: scope of autonomy of religious educational institutions - Prof. Pierre-Henri PRÉLOT, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France

Chair: Prof Norman DOE, University of Cardiff, UK

12.30-13.00     Summary/Concluding Remarks

Prof. QC. Mark HILL, King’s College London, UK

13.00-14.00     Lunch

19.30   Dinner

SEMINAR READING

Seminar participants will be provided with the country-specific reports by the members of the European Consortium for Church and State Research. Reading the reports will enable you to actively participate in the discussion and ask questions. The reports will be sent to registered students before the seminars. Below are some preliminary suggestions to familiarize yourself with the topic:

  • "Securitization of Islam and religious discrimination: Religious minorities in Western democracies, 1990–2008" (Springer)
  • "Religious Radicalization and Securitization in Canada and Beyond" (University of Toronto Press)
  • "The Politicisation and Securitisation of Religious Education? A rejoinder", British Journal of Educational Studies, 63 (3)
  • "Islamophobia and Securitization Religion, Ethnicity and the Female Voice" (2016, Macmillan)
  • Lazarus, Liora, ‘The Right to Security - Securing Rights or Securitising Rights’ in R Dickinson et al, "Examining Critical Perspectives on Human Rights" (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2012). https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2207936

Those students who need credits for their participation please contact Dr. Merilin Kiviorg (merilin.kiviorg@ut.ee)

For additional information about the doctoral seminar or conference topics please contact Dr. Merilin Kiviorg (merilin.kiviorg@ut.ee) or Dr. Merike Ristikivi (merike.ristikivi@ut.ee ) .